In re Charles Street African Methodist Episcopal Church of Boston, 510 B.R. 453 (Bankr. D. Mass. 2014) – In connection with a proposed sale of real property, a chapter 11 debtor sought to prohibit the mortgagee from submitting a credit bid. It … Continue reading →

(posted 5 days 23 hours ago)

Recently, I have successfully defended two defendants in debt collection cases involving old credit card bills.  In each case, my clients (the defendants) either did not remember ever creating the debt or being serviced with the suit papers.
In both cases we reached favorable outcomes because we demanded strict proof that could not be provided by the Plaintiffs.  As a result, the attorney for the debt collectors and debt buyers had to drop their case and dismiss the claims.
In a set of facts that is stranger than fiction, my client received notice of garnishment relating to a very old judgment filed against her.   She insisted to me that she never was served with the original lawsuit.  After I entered my appearance, I went to the Court and obtained a copy of the Notice of Service by the Private Process Server claiming that my client was served with the lawsuit way back in 2004.  My client denied ever getting this paperwork and something seemed a little strange about the Notice of Service.
Out of curiosity, I googled the Process Server’s name to see if he was even still alive.  Much to my surprise, he had been a Police Officer who went to federal penitentiary for his involvement in a massive fraud scheme involving kickbacks from a towing service.

Scholnick Law
(posted 6 days 7 hours ago)

Recientemente, yo he defendido con éxito a dos acusados en casos de cobro de deudas involucrando facturas de tarjetas de crédito viejas. En cada uno de los casos, mis clientes (los acusados), una de dos, o no recordaban haber generado la deuda o haber sido notificados con los papeles de la demanda. En ambos casos, nosotros obtuvimos resultados favorables porque exigimos prueba estricta que no fue provista por los Demandantes. Como resultado, el Abogado de los cobradores de deudas tuvo que retirar el caso y descartó las demandas.
En una serie de hechos en donde la realidad supera a la ficción,  mi clienta recibió un aviso de embargo relacionado a una muy antigua sentencia solicitada en contra de ella. Ella me insistió que nunca había sido notificada de la demanda original. Después de que yo ingresé mi comparecencia, yo fui a la Corte y obtuve una copia del Aviso de Notificación de un Notificador Privado asegurando que mi clienta fue notificada con la demanda legal desde el 2004.  Mi clienta negó haber recibido este documento y algo parecía un poco extraño acerca del Aviso de Notificación.
Por curiosidad, yo busqué en Google el nombre del Notificador del Aviso para ver si él aún estaba vivo. Para mi gran sorpresa, él había sido un Oficial de Policía que fue a una Penitenciaría Federal por su participación en un plan de fraude masivo que involucró soborno por parte de un servicio de grúas.

Scholnick Law
(posted 6 days 8 hours ago)

All day I have been thinking that September 15 is a significant date, but I couldn't remember why.  And finally I remembered why.  On September 15, 2008, Lehman Brothers filed the largest bankruptcy in United States history.  And so, today is the 6 year anniversary....
Per http://bankruptcy.einnews.com/article/223896208/9Gilzx68J31h45VH:

The COMI
(posted 6 days 9 hours ago)

 
Recientemente, yo he defendido con éxito a dos acusados en casos de cobro de deudas involucrando facturas de tarjetas de crédito viejas. En cada uno de los casos, mis clientes (los acusados), una de dos, o no recordaban haber generado la deuda o haber sido notificados con los papeles de la demanda. En ambos casos, nosotros obtuvimos resultados favorables porque exigimos prueba estricta que no fue provista por los Demandantes. Como resultado, el Abogado de los cobradores de deudas tuvo que retirar el caso y descartó las demandas.   
En el primer caso, yo representé a un acusado en un caso pro bono en nombre del Centro de Recursos Pro Bono de Maryland, Proyecto de Protección al Consumidor. Mi cliente estaba siendo demandado por una vieja deuda que fue adquirida por un comprador de deuda. Mi cliente me dijo que él no recordaba haber tenido una tarjeta de crédito con el Banco que después vendió la cuenta a un comprador de deuda. Antes de que me pidieran representarlo, mi cliente fue a corte y le dijo al Juez que él no recordaba haber tenido alguna vez esta cuenta. Él le preguntó al juez si podía pedirle al abogado del comprador de la deuda demostrar con los documentos originales, facturas u otro papel de trabajo que pudiera refrescar su memoria y comprobar que él no era víctima de un robo de identidad.

Scholnick Law
(posted 6 days 9 hours ago)

Recently, I have successfully defended two defendants in debt collection cases involving old credit card bills.  In each case, my clients (the defendants) either did not remember ever creating the debt or being serviced with the suit papers.
In both cases we reached favorable outcomes because we demanded strict proof that could not be provided by the Plaintiffs.  As a result, the attorney for the debt collectors and debt buyers had to drop their case and dismiss the claims.
In the first case, I represented a defendant pro bono on behalf of the Pro Bono Resource Center of Maryland, Consumer Protection Project.  My client was being sued for an old debt that was bought by a debt buyer.  My client told me that he does not remember ever having a charge card with the Bank that later sold the account to a debt buyer.  Before I was asked to represent him, my client went to court and told the Judge that he did not remember ever having this account.  He asked the Judge if he could have the attorney for the debt buyer prove the original documentation, bills, or other paperwork that would jog his memory and prove that he was not the victim of identity theft.

Scholnick Law
(posted 6 days 10 hours ago)

Make-whole provisions have come up in bankruptcy court again, this time before Judge Drain in the Momentive Performance Materials case.  Per Weil's Bankruptcy Blog:

The COMI
(posted 6 days 10 hours ago)

Detroit has reached a final settlement with its greatest opponent, bond insurer Syncora Guarantee Inc., this Monday, according to a lawyer for the city.
Under the deal, Syncora will recover roughly 14 percent of money owed, which they've long claimed totals more than $333 million. Syncora will receive two sets of notes from Detroit, a lease to control a tunnel to Canada, land near the tunnel, and the possibility of leasing and controlling a parking structure.
With this settlement, Syncora is fully exiting the Chapter 9 bankruptcy case , including any future appeals.
David Heiman of Jones Day, a lawyer for Detroit, said to U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Steven Rhodes in Monday’s hearing that both parties have “laid down their swords.”
While the agreement with Syncora is an important cleared hurdle for Detroit’s bankruptcy emergence, the city still faces creditor Financial Guaranty Insurance Co., who is seeking roughly $1.1 billion from the pension debt it insured.
On Monday, FGIC asked Judge Rhodes to suspend the trial until September 22 so the company can modify its approach in the wake of Syncora’s settlement. The trial is currently on hold since last week so Detroit and Syncora could finalize their deal.
Detroit’s Grand Bargain is centered around an estimated $816 in pension debt. FGIC may be held responsible for payment if investors end up taking losses.

Total Bankruptcy
(posted 6 days 12 hours ago)

It takes a bankruptcy expert to explain what is true and what is myth about filing personal bankruptcy. The public has extraordinary misconceptions on the subject of personal bankruptcy. Even the chattering money experts on TV talk shows know next to nothing about it.
Have you ever said, “I can’t pay my bills?” If you have, this article is for you.

Los Angeles Bankruptcy Blog
(posted 6 days 13 hours ago)