All items from Credit Slips

CFPBcomplaintsbyproductThis week the CFPB announced it's seeking public comments on a proposed policy that would allow consumers who file a complaint with the agency to share all of the (non-personally identifying) details of that complaint with the public as part of its Consumer Complaint Database. (Right now the database only identifies the financial product complained about, name of the company, and a category identifying the topic of the complaint).



Posted 9 weeks 4 hours ago

At today's House Judiciary Committee hearing on Operation Choke Point it seemed that Choke Point's critics are conflating a fairly narrow DOJ civil investigation with separate general guidance given by prudential regulators.  In particular, Rep. Issa attempted to tie them together by noting that the DOJ referenced such guidance in its Choke Point subpoenas, but that's quite different than actually bringing a civil action on such a basis (or on the basis of "reputational risk"), which the DOJ has not done.  



Posted 9 weeks 15 hours ago

Pop quiz:  what do payday lenders have in common with on-line gun shops, escort services, pornography websites, on-line gambling and the purveyors of drug paraphrenalia or racist materials?  
You can read my testimony for this Thursday's House Judiciary Committee, Subcommittee on Regulatory Reform, Commercial, and Antitrust Law's hearing on Operation Choke Pointo find out. Or you can just keep reading here.  

What all of these businesses have in common is that they are considered high-risk customers by banks. What makes these industries high-risk for banks? Many of their payments are disputed. Sometimes the issue is consumer fraud, sometimes merchant fraud:  happily married men vehemently deny subscribing to porn sites or having paid for an escort service. Or a payday lenders might demand an ACH payment without authorization.  All of this matters to banks because banks make various warranties when they transmit or demand payments within the payment system. If a payment isn't authorized, the bank can be stuck with the loss. 



Posted 9 weeks 2 days ago

A quick note on a couple of events today that might be of interest to Slips readers:
First, I'm participating in an ABI webinar about "chapter 14" and related topics.
Second, I'll be testifying in front of the House Judiciary Committee on proposed legislation to add a subchapter V to chapter 11, for financial institutions.
Otherwise, resume your summer and I'll bother you no more.



Posted 9 weeks 3 days ago

Chapter 13 trustees handle millions of dollars in plan payments every year. At some point in likely a sizable portion of cases, the trustee accumulates these payments instead of distributing the funds to creditors. What happens if a debtor's case is converted while the trustee has this accumulated money in its account? In 2012, the 3rd Circuit, in a majority opinion, held that the trustee must return the funds to the debtor (see decision here). Yesterday the 5th Circuit held that the trustee must distribute the funds to creditors (see decision here), thus creating a split on an issue that, as the Fifth Circuit stated, "has divided courts for thirty years," though only had previously produced one appellate court decision squarely on point.
With only one-third of Chapter 13 cases making it to discharge, the issue potentially affects a good number of debtors and involves a significant amount of money in total. Each individual debtor may (or may not) be entitled to a large sum of money in his or her estimation. In the 3rd Circuit case, the Chapter 13 trustee had accumulated over $9,000 in undistributed payments. In the 5th Circuit case, the trustee was holding about $5,500 in undistributed payments. And to the extent there isn't at least a local rule to rely on, Chapter 13 trustee probably would like clearer guidance on the issue.  



Posted 10 weeks 28 min ago

FolderRowTo what extent does secured credit law protect creditors from the consequences of mistaken actions made on their behalf? I wrote about this issue in March 2013. As discussed in that post, the bankruptcy court issued both a decision on the merits and a certification for a direct appeal to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit.
The 2nd Circuit has now certified the following question to the Delaware Supreme Court: 



Posted 10 weeks 1 day ago

GazellesUntil a few days ago, it looked like Detroit's chapter 9 plan confirmation would come and go untouched by appellate process. In February 2014, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit granted seven petitions for direct appeal of the bankruptcy court's eligibility decision, which included the finding that pension claims could be impaired in bankruptcy. But the Sixth Circuit did not act on the request for expedited consideration. Somewhat remarkably, it agreed to do what the bankruptcy court had requested in its certification memo: consult with the bankruptcy court's lead mediator to consider the impact of the appeal's timing on negotiations.



Posted 10 weeks 4 days ago

I thought I'd write a quick follow-up to Anna's thorough post about the latest in the Argentine bond saga. A lot happened at Friday's hearing, which was convened after NML requested that the judge hold Argentina in contempt for transferring funds to Bank of New York Mellon and others. The transcript reveals an exasperated judge without a great deal of interest in parsing the separate parties and interests at stake. The result was one clear loser (holders of English-law bonds denominated in euros) and one clear winner (holders of Argentina's local-law bonds).



Posted 11 weeks 3 days ago

Extra! Extra!  Today is just another day in Argentina's bond saga. It may well come and go with no payments either to the NML plaintiffs or to the restructured bondholders. However, a Sunday filing by Argentina's Euro-denominated exchange bond holders might lead to substantive developments eclipsing the purely symbolic significance of a missed payment date and the start of a 30-day contractual grace period.  The Euro bond holders' move is a good place to start thinking about the next steps and beyond.



Posted 11 weeks 3 days ago

PRflag The fast-moving legislation's title does not include the word bankruptcy. Materials distributed by the Puerto Rico government explain, though, that the bill is meant to provide chapter 9-like relief to Puerto Rico public corporations through one of two paths - one more prepack-like than the other. Calling the effort "dazzling," Cate Long notes, "[s]eldom have financial markets seen such an elegantly choreographed approach to haircutting sovereign debt."



Posted 11 weeks 5 days ago