All items from Credit Slips

A long long time ago in this same galaxy, I wrote what may be Credit Slips' most popular post: What do bankruptcy mortgage servicing and phone sex in common? Today, I bring you a new comparison: bankruptcy mortgage servicing and ebola. At the outset, let me be very clear that ebola is a tragic health care crisis. I do not mean to minimize those deaths and illnesses with a comparison to mortgage servicing--although to be sure, poor mortgage servicing has tragic financial consequences.



Posted 5 days 20 hours ago

IMG_4527Just back from European Law and Economics, where the big topics at the coffee breaks were the Scottish vote, until that was resolved, sort of, Argentina, which is widely seen as a self-created mess for the U.S. courts, and the Air France strike, which caused presenters and chairs to miss sessions at random throughout the conference.



Posted 6 days 23 hours ago

Yoga for lawyersAnd now time for something entirely different. I noticed a great new book in our list of library acquisitions recently that might be of particular interest to two groups that suffer from lots of stress: lawyers and debtors! Credit Slips' own Nathalie Martin has teamed up with a lawyer-turned-yogi and the ABA to produce a really wonderful new book, Yoga for Laywers: Mind-Body Techniques to Feel Better All the Time. The book contains a very nice discussion of stress, its causes and effects, and its relief through yoga poses, mindfulness and meditation.  I've read a lot of these kinds of books, and this one stands out as particulary clear and readable. Moreover, the yoga section is extraordinarily accessible.



Posted 1 week 21 hours ago

The Second Circuit has refused to hear Citibank's appeal of Judge Griesa's order enjoining Citi from making payment on USD-denominated, Argentine-law bonds. The Second Circuit's order is a bit... Delphic. Weighing in at all of 56 words, not counting citations, the court simply "decline[d] to find jurisdiction" because the district judge's order "is a clarification, not a modification" of the injunction. The distinction seems a bit fine, given the stakes. Recall that some USD-denominated, Argentine law bonds are Exchange Bonds (and thus subject to the injunction) while some are not. But it seems that it is impossible to tell them apart. Two options, then: (1) forbid Citi to pay anyone, even though NML concededly has no right to block payment on non-Exchange Bonds, or (2) allow Citi to pay everyone, thus allowing a subset of Exchange Bonds to escape the injunction. The district judge chose option one. In theory, the district judge can reconsider (re-clarify?) that decision, but I am not holding my breath.



Posted 1 week 3 days ago

A Adp-garnishment-report-1 valuable and groundbreaking source of data on wage garnishment has just been released by ADP, the nation's largest payroll services provider. I immediately recalled a great paper by Rich Hynes about the paucity of wage garnishments in Virginia and Illinois in the mid-2000s. According to ADP, things have changed since the recession, especially for blue-collar (manufacturing and transportation/utilities) workers in the Midwest making between $25,000 and $40,000 a year, of whom more than 10% suffered a garnishment in 2011-2013. About half of these garnishments were for child support, but the other half were for taxes, consumer debts, and bankruptcy cases (presumably wage orders entered for Chapter 13 plans).



Posted 1 week 5 days ago

Interesting op-ed on digital wallets by Edward Castronova and Joshua Fairfield in the NYT. I'm a little more skeptical. Thoughts follow the break.

(1) We already live in a world of digital currency.
Thanks to fractional reserve banking and electronic records, most currency and transactions are electronic now, not cash. Most money is already digital; there is a right of paper convertibility, but we're in a digital currency world without involving Satoshis and Ripples (¿or is that ripplakh?). 
(2) Government Acceptance of a Currency Matters...A LOT. 



Posted 2 weeks 21 hours ago

ChessThe trial on the City of Detroit's restructuring takes a hiatus while insurer Syncora and others try to finalize a settlement. The deal seems to be a hybrid of enhanced treatment for Syncora's class of claims in Detroit's plan (class 9) and other value for Syncora alone, such as rights in Detroit property, and possibly a release from insurance obligations on interest rate swaps. The deal does not resolve class 9 objections as a whole.



Posted 2 weeks 3 days ago

Apple Pay has been getting a lot of attention, and I hope to do a longer post on it, but for now let me highlight one possible issue that does not seem to have gotten any attention. I think Apple may have just become a regulated financial institution, unwittingly. Basically, I think Apple is now a "service provider" for purposes of the Consumer Financial Protection Act, which means Apple is subject to CFPB examination and UDAAP. 

Here's the argument. Be warned:  this is a romp through some legal definitions. 
The CFPB has authority over two classes of people:  "covered persons" and "service providers".  The CFPB has authority over these classes to the extent they are offering a "financial product or service."  Apple does not currently fit within the definition of "covered person" because it is not offering a "financial product or service".  Apple Pay does not actually transmit funds (they way, say PayPal does); that's why Apple doesn't have a MSB license (as far as I'm aware). 



Posted 2 weeks 5 days ago

One of the competitors in the Great Mobile Payments Race is changing its name. Isis Wallet, a mobile payments joint venture of AT&T, Verizon, and T-Mobile is changing its name to Softcard for fairly obvious reasons. Isis Wallet operates by having the consumer store his/her payment card information on a "secure element"--tech speak for a tamper resistant chip that safely stores encrypted information.  (The particular secure element for Isis Wallet depends on the phone model.) That payment information is then communicated with merchants using NFC (near field communications, i.e., contactless).  Isis Wallet also integrates various loyalty programs and merchant offers (including some that are proximity based). As Apple's Apple Pay platform shows, mobile payments is becoming a crowded field with some real heavyweights. Yet, as I'll blog shortly, there are some real challenges ahead for anyone in the field. 



Posted 2 weeks 6 days ago

The Archdiocese of Milwaukee is one of 11 dioceses (plus 2 other Catholic-affiliated religious orders) to file under Chapter 11 -- and it likely will not be the last. All of the cases were filed in hopes of achieving global settlements of sexual abuse claims. The Milwaukee Archdiocese filed over 3.5 years ago, in January 2011, making it the longest running Diocese case. 6 of the 7 other dioceses that filed before it confirmed reorganization plans in an average of about 2 years after filing. The shortest time to confirmation was 10 months, while the longest was 2.75 years. The other diocese, San Diego, negotiated a settlement, via mediation, in approximately 9 months.

The Milwaukee Archdiocese and its creditors (predominately abuse claimants) have spent the last 3.5 years, despite a trip to mediation in 2012, primarily fighting over a $55 million trust fund established to pay for upkeep of the diocese's cemetery. Without the $55 million, abuse claimants are likely to receive no more than $4 million. The $4 million figure would be smallest settlement paid to abuse claimants in any of the Catholic Church bankruptcies so far. The cemetery trust issue is pending before the 7th Circuit. Meanwhile, attorneys' and other professionals' fees are rising, leading Judge Kelley to order the parties back to mediation, starting tomorrow.



Posted 3 weeks 1 day ago